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Welcome to Snakebite Cases
   
   
Our Aim
   
To share our treatment experiences of snakebite cases with Doctors who are involved in SNAKEBITE CASES TREATMENT, & To achieve the rate of mortality 0%, & to educate the people about snakebite ,It's treatment as well as PREVENTION OF SNAKEBITE.
   
Snake Bite
   
A snakebite is an injury caused by a bite from a snake, often resulting in puncture wounds inflicted by the animal's fangs and sometimes resulting in envenomation. Although the majority of snake species are non-venomous and typically kill their prey with constriction rather than venom, venomous snakes can be found on every continent except Antarctica. Snakes often bite their prey as a method of hunting, but also for defensive purposes against predators. Since the physical appearance of snakes may differ, there is often no practical way to identify a species and professional medical attention should be sought.

The outcome of snake bites depends on numerous factors, including the species of snake, the area of the body bitten, the amount of venom injected, and the health conditions of the victim. Feelings of terror and panic are common after a snakebite and can produce a characteristic set of symptoms mediated by the autonomic nervous system, such as a racing heart and nausea. Bites from non-venomous snakes can also cause injury, often due to lacerations caused by the snake's teeth, or from a resulting infection. A bite may also trigger an anaphylactic reaction, which is potentially fatal. First aid recommendations for bites depend on the snakes inhabiting the region, as effective treatments for bites inflicted by some species can be ineffective for others.
 
Signs and Symptoms
   
The most common symptoms of all snakebites are overwhelming fear, panic, and emotional instability, which may cause symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, vertigo, fainting, tachycardia, and cold, clammy skin. Television, literature, and folklore are in part responsible for the hype surrounding snakebites, and a victim may have unwarranted thoughts of imminent death.

Dry snakebites, and those inflicted by a non-venomous species, can still cause severe injury to the victim. There are several reasons for this: a snakebite which is not treated properly may become infected (as is often reported by the victims of viper bites whose fangs are capable of inflicting deep puncture wounds), the bite may cause anaphylaxis in certain people, and the snake's saliva and fangs may harbor many dangerous microbial contaminants, including Clostridium tetani. If neglected, an infection may spread and potentially kill the victim.

Most snakebites, whether by a venomous snake or not, will have some type of local effect. There is minor pain and redness in over 90% of cases, although this varies depending on the site. Bites by vipers and some cobras may be extremely painful, with the local tissue sometimes becoming tender and severely swollen within 5 minutes. This area may also bleed and blister and can eventually lead to tissue necrosis. Other common initial symptoms of pitviper and viper bites include lethargy, bleeding, weakness, nausea, and vomiting. Symptoms may become more life-threatening over time, developing into hypotension, tachypnea, severe tachycardia, severe internal bleeding, altered sensorium, kidney failure, and respiratory failure.

Interestingly, bites caused by the Mojave rattlesnake, kraits, coral snake, and the speckled rattlesnake reportedly cause little or no pain despite being serious injuries. Victims may also describe a "rubbery," "minty," or "metallic" taste if bitten by certain species of rattlesnake. Spitting cobras and rinkhalses can spit venom in their victims' eyes. This results in immediate pain, ophthalmoparesis, and sometimes blindness
  Dr. D. C. Patel M. S. (Gen. Surg.)
     
 

Wide Experience in treating Snake bite patients since last 18 years, with having very less mortality. In year 2004, 449 patients were treated & NOT A SINGLE DEATH WHILE TREATMENT.
(0% Mortality) .

  Excelllence
  Snakebite
  Accident & Trauma
  General Surgery
  Poisoning case
     
 
                 
         
                 
                 
  Non Poisonous Snakes   Poisonous Snakes   Venom & Anti venom   Snakebite Prevention